Communicating Hazard Information in the Modern Environment (CHIME)

Satellite image of Hurricane Irma threatening Florida Sept 2017

Overview

With advances in scientific predictions, risk communication, and communication technology, hazard preparedness and warning response are changing rapidly. This project -- funded through the National Science Foundation Hazards SEES (Science, Engineering, and Education for Sustainability) program -- aims to reduce harm from hurricanes and other hazards, alleviate social vulnerability, and enhance resilience by improving hazardous weather risk communication and response in the modern information environment. This includes building understanding of how evolving weather forecasts and warnings interact with societal information flow and decisions as a hurricane approaches and arrives.                 Satellite and aftermath damage images Hurricanes Maria, Irma, Jose and Katia, Sept 2017

The project brings together concepts, methods, and expertise from computer and information sciences, atmospheric and related sciences, and social and behavioral sciences to integrate study of the real-world hazard information system with computational physical and social modeling. The research includes analysis of data from social media streams; focus groups with more vulnerable populations; development and testing of prototype integrations of information; high-resolution ensemble hurricane and storm-surge modeling; and agent-based modeling of social actors who pursue, process, and transmit information. To enhance applicability of the research, our project also involves interactions with key stakeholder groups.

News and Events

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number 1331490. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

This project is a collaborative effort among the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Arizona State University, and the University of Colorado Boulder, with sponsorship from the National Science Foundation.

Collaborated efforts sponsored by:

Photo Credits: NASA-NOAA, Joshua Stevens using data from NASA-NOAA GOES, Carlos Giusti/AP Photo, NOAA, and Gerben Van Es.